Boston Tea Party – December 16 – 1773 – Ruining of British Tea at Boston Port

The Boston Tea Party was in objection to all the taxes, most recently was the Tea Act, which Britain had implemented on the colonists. The colonists had had enough of the heavy taxation and enough of the acts passed by Britain and enforced by her soldiers. The colonists felt that if someone else was going to make laws for them and tax them, then the colonists should at least be allowed to have a representative in England to voice the colonists’ concerns and opinions. Because the colonists were not being allowed to have a representative in England, they decided to tell Britain in a different way that they did not want their tea or their acts or their taxes. The colonials felt that they needed to show Britain that the American colonies were ready to stand alone and were ready to fight to make their own laws and decisions.

Boston Tea Party - 16 December 1773 - Ruining of Tea, British, East India Company

Boston Tea Party – 16 December 1773 – Ruining of Tea, British, East India Company

Boston Tea Party – Background

Three East India Trading Company ships were docked in the Boston harbor and held hundreds of tea chests. The colonists refused to buy the tea, and the East India Trading Company refused to leave with the tea still on their vessels. So, the ships floated there in the harbor.

A group of colonists that called themselves “the Sons of Liberty” decided upon a plan that would relieve the ships of their tea cargo, so that the East India Trading Company would leave the harbor. These Sons of Liberty had been meeting secretly for a couple years planning ways to get back at the British for the acts that the British parliament had been passing. The latest Tea Act was looked upon as another way for Britain to control the colony’s supplies and daily living.

Boston Tea Party - 16 December 1773 - Sons of Liberty, dressed as Indians

Boston Tea Party – 16 December 1773 – Sons of Liberty, dressed as Indians

 In the cover of a cold December night in 1773, the Sons of Liberty, dressed as Native American Indians, raided the East India Trading Company ships throwing over 300 chests loaded with tea into the Boston harbor. The Sons of Liberty believed that, if asked, they could say that the Native Indians were responsible for the depositing of the tea into the harbor, but everyone in Boston and in England knew that the Indians had not committed this act. The British were outraged at this odious crime.

Consequences of Boston Tea Party

As a result of the colonists’ ruining of the tea, the British would soon discontinue Boston’s local government and trade it for British soldiers that would enforce the rules that Britain’s parliament would pass.  The following year, new acts were passed that only made Boston’s colonials more upset and aggressive. The Sons of Liberty and others continued their raids against the British soldiers and those who were loyal to Britain.

Soon the strain between the colonies and Britain was too much and war broke out between the two countries.

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